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Marine Corps Cordinating Council Kentucky

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Kentucky Legends

Set forth below are biographies of Marines, who have either been born or have lived in the Commonwealth of Kentucky at some time during their lives, either as private citizens or on active duty, or have been interred in Kentucky following their death, and have distinguished themselves through exceptional and/or valorous service to their nation. Nominations for inclusion of additional Marines for this honor should be forwarded, with supporting documentation, to the Marine Corps Coordinating Council of Kentucky for its consideration.

 

Kentucky Legends

Set forth below are biographies of Marines, who have either been born or have lived in the Commonwealth of Kentucky at some time during their lives, either as private citizens or on active duty, or have been interred in Kentucky following their death, and have distinguished themselves through exceptional and/or valorous service to their nation. Nominations for inclusion of additional Marines for this honor should be forwarded, with supporting documentation, to the Marine Corps Coordinating Council of Kentucky for its consideration.

 

William E. Barber (MOH)
William E. Barber

William Earl Barber (1919-2002) was an officer in the United States Marine Corps awarded with the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War. With only 220 men under his command, Barber held off more than 1,400 Peoples Republic of China soldiers during six days of fighting.

Charles D. Barrett
Charles D. Barrett

Major General Charles Dodson Barrett (16 August 1885 - 8 October 1943) was the first Commanding General of the 3rd Marine Division. He was killed accidentally while on duty in the South Pacific, 8 October 1943. He was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Medal in recognition of his outstanding service during World War II.

William B. Baugh (MOH)
William B. Baugh

Private First Class William Bernard Baugh (July 7, 1930 - November 29, 1950) was a United States Marine, who at age 20, earned the Medal of Honor in Korea for sacrificing his life to save his Marine comrades. The nation's highest decoration for valor was awarded the young Marine for extraordinary heroism on 29 November 1950, between Koto-ri and Hagaru-ri, when he protected the members of his squadron from a grenade by smothering it with his body.

Richard E. Bush (MOH)
Richard E. Bush

Richard Earl Bush (1924-2004) was a United States Marine who received the Medal of Honor as a corporal for heroism on Okinawa in World War II. On April 16, 1945, Cpl Bush threw himself on a live grenade, absorbing the force of the explosion, to save the lives of fellow Marines. During World War II, 27 Marines similarly used their bodies to cover exploding grenades in order to save the lives of others.

Harold G. Epperson (MOH)
Harold G. Epperson

Harold Glenn Epperson was born 14 July 1923  in Akron, Ohio. As a member of the 1st Battalion 6th Marines, Private First Class (PFC)  Harold Glenn Epperson shared in the Presidential Unit Citation awarded his organization for its service at the Battle of Tarawa during World War II. PFC Epperson died in action against the Japanese on Saipan on 25 June 1944 when he threw himself upon an enemy grenade in order to save the lives of his fellow Marines.

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